Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun

December 2013: Authorship in Search Results Gets Restricted

UPDATE 21 January 2013: I have now published results of my study detailing who lost Google Authorship and why.

UPDATE: While composing this post, Barry Schwartz of Search Engine Land reported that Google confirms that Authorship results in search are being intentionally reduced.

It appears that the Matt Cutts-promised reductions to the amount of Google Authorship results being shown in Google Search has begun.

I have been getting an increasing number of reports from Google Authorship users, at my Google Authorship and Author Rank Community and elsewhere, that their Authorship rich snippets for search results for their content have either completely disappeared, disappeared for some sites but not for others, or are showing in a new limited form (with author byline but no author photo).

See for example, this side-by-side before and after SERPs comparison for the same query, posted by Cyrus Shepard on Google+:

Has Google Begun to Purge Google Authorship in Search?

Further evidence that a reduction is underway can be seen in this screen cap from the new Moz Google Features Graph. It shows the amount of Google Authorship snippets showing in the SERPs for the past 30 days (up to 18 December 2013).

Has Google Begun to Purge Google Authorship in Search?

As you can see, it appears Authorship snippets started to decline around the beginning of December, then took a nose dive around the 12th, and after a couple of days of leveling off, have taken another plunge. It’s true that if you look at the scale of the graph it’s only about a 3% reduction overall so far, but given that Authorship has been pretty steady in the SERPs for a long time, that’s still a significant change.

Reduction in Authorship in SERPs Was Promised

Has Google Begun to Purge Google Authorship in Search?In his keynote speech at Pubcon Las Vegas this past October, Google’s Matt Cutts said that they had been testing a reduction in the amount of Authorship snippets shown in search results, and they found that when they reduced them by about 15%, “quality went up.” Cutts did not make clear whether it was the quality of the authorship results or the overall quality of the SERPs that improved, or for that matter, even what he meant by “quality.”

But one thing seemed clear: at some point the amount of Authorship snippets in search would decline, and that “quality” would be the reason, and perhaps the criteria.

For reference, here’s exactly what Cutts said at Pubcon:

We want to make sure that the people who we show as authors are high quality authors. And so we’re looking at the process of possibly tightening that up. It turns out  if we reduce the amount of authorship we are showing by just about 10 or 15 percent, we’re radically able to improve the quality of the authors that we show. Which is another nice signal for those searchers and users who are typing into Google and say, “Ah, I see this picture, I see this person is an author. This is something I can trust. This is content that I really want to see.” So it’s not just going to be about the markup; it’s going to be about the quality of the author.

Three Classes of Authorship

Another change being noticed by Authorship observers is that there now appears to be three “classes” of people who use Google Authorship in terms of how they show up (or don’t show up) in search:

First Class: Full Authorship Snippet

These authors still tend to get the full authorship snippet (author photo + byline + [optional] number of Google+ circles).

Has Google Begun to Purge Google Authorship in Search?

Second Class: Byline But No Photo

These authors still get an author byline under the link text in their search results (and sometimes the number of Google+ circles they’re in, at least in the US), but no author photo.

Has Google Begun to Purge Google Authorship in Search?

Third Class: No Authorship Rich Snippet At All

These authors used to get authorship rich snippets for some or all of their content, but no longer get it.

What is most interesting here, of course, is that new “second class.” We used to only see that kind of authorship result when the author already had another result on the same SERP showing an author photo. Google only allows one author photo per author per search page. But now we are seeing these “headless snippets” appearing all by themselves. They indeed seem to be a new “middle class” of authorship rich snippets.

What Authors Are Being Affected?

It’s too early to say for sure if there are definite signs or telltale common characteristics among authors who have dropped to the second or third class of authorship. But we are seeing the emergence of some patterns from the anecdotal reports we are receiving from users whose authorship has dropped. So far the primary patterns seem to have more to do with sites than authors. In addition. there has been no discernible rankings change for most authors. So this does not appear to be an “author rank” update, but rather a culling out of sites that are not meeting some undefined threshold of quality for showing full author snippets.

  • Well-established authors who regularly publish in-depth content on trusted sites and whose content tends to get a lot of links and social shares appear to have been spared. I have yet to receive a report of anyone at that level who has dropped to second or third class.
  • Exception to above: I’ve now found a few such authors who still get first class results for some sites on which they publish, but not others. This indicates that the loss of authorship may be more site-tied than author-tied.
  • Number of Google+ followers has no bearing. I’m still seeing first class examples with just a handful of people circling them.
  • It is looking more and more like this may be  a site-by-site assessment rather than author-by-author.  I am hearing about sites where the snippet class of all their authors dropped for content they had published on the site. And as noted above, some authors are showing full rich snippets for some sites but not for others.
  • Connecting authorship to pages that violate the guidelines in the Google Authorship FAQ published earlier this year may cause one to drop in Authorship class. These are pages that don’t “convey a real person’s perspective or analysis on a topic.” Examples given include product pages and property listings.

UPDATE 5:42 PM EST 19 December 2013: I’m hearing from more and more high reputation authors who are seeing changes to their authorship class that are site-specific. See this comment from Jon Henshaw of Raven Tools:

Google Begins to Purge Authorship in Search

I’m beginning to lean toward the idea that this reduction may have been applied either mostly or entirely on a site-by-site rather than author-by-author basis, or perhaps some mix of both.

Disclaimer! These are extremely early and tentative observations. While they seem to conform to the reports I’m getting from many users, I can find exceptions to all but the first. For the other three, I can still find examples here and there of people who seem to violate the principle yet still get a full first class snippet in search. Of course, it could be that we are still in the rollout stage of this change, and that more heads may roll (almost literally!) in the days to come.

Much more I could say, but I want to get this post out while this news is breaking. I’ll follow up with updates as we learn more

Have you tried our Virante AuthorRank tool? Get a score of the relative search ranking power of your Google Authorship-linked content. Try it here!

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Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun by

Mark is Director of Digital Outreach for Virante Inc. Mark helps businesses build strategies to increase brand influence and attract natural links and social signals. He has a special reputation as an expert on Google+ and Google Authorship. A former teacher, Mark has worked directly in Internet marketing since 2005, but has been involved in social media and online community formation since the mid 1990s. When not helping Virante clients improve their online presence, Mark participates in competitive storytelling, plays with a Dixieland street band, and (surprise) spends more time on the web.

Comments

  1. What I’ve noticed so far:

    1) For my travel niches, nearly all author photos have disappeared from the SERPs. (About.com pages being the conspicuous exceptions.)

    2) I’m still seeing a lot of author photos on technology SERPs, but the vast majority are from high-visibility sites like PCMag, CNet, Engadget, the Verge, and such. (The authors aren’t necessarily established or well-known, but the sites are, which leads me to wonder if Google’s current authorship display is more about publishers than it is about authors.)

    A while back, Google announced partnerships with WordPress, Typepad, About.com, Examiner, and a few other major sites and platforms to implement Authorship automatically on their pages. Maybe that arrangement has become less important now that Google is focusing on “entity extraction” rather than on markup. Or maybe not.

    Personal side note: I was one of the early authors to have a byline and photo in my search results, but–as I’ve mentioned elsewhere–”rich snippets” for my main editorial site disappeared from the SERPs earlier in 2013, probably around the same time that Barry Schwartz lost his. At the same time, I continued to get a photo and byline with my blog posts (hosted by TypePad), although those are now gone, too. I’m a little perplexed by this, since I’ve been writing about my main travel topics since 1996 to 1998 (depending on topic), have been publishing at my current domain since 2001, have attracted plenty of decent links over the years, and rank in the top 10 for many Google search queries. Nearly all of my articles are in-depth, and many have both schema.org “article” markup and link rel=”prev”/link rel=”next” pagination. I can’t help wondering why I’m not getting even minimal respect from Google’s Authorship algorithm–especially when I see author bylines and photos next to search results from Examiner.com, of all places.

    • Durant, I have come to agree that this is much more of a publisher update than author update. But I also agree that the criteria for publishing sites is making little sense in many cases.

    • I have a blog which gets a lot of traffic and I use authorship. I am not some famous well known site. The question now is do I stop using the authorship to ensure my content keeps ranking well. I have checked some of my posts and my name and picture is still there. Do I wait to see and if I do I will have lost my traffic by then or do I remove it now. Needless to say this is because people made up fake authors trying to game google and now the rest of us have to suffer again.

      • I haven’t seen any evidence to suggest that bylines and photos or authorship markup have anything to do with rankings. And based on things that people like Eric Schmidt and Matt Cutts of Google have said in the past about verified authors vs. anonymous authors, it’s reasonable to assume that authorship markup could be useful in the future even if you *don’t* get rich snippets in the SERPs.

  2. Wow, what a great post. What I love about Virante is there are never any fluff posts. You guys always post info that is way ahead of the curve and always interesting. On the subject of this post, this is definitely something that I’ve been *kind of* noticing here and there, but never thought it was this serious!

  3. Yes it is true I have also seen many of my friends who are good webmaster there image is not coming along with there blogs

  4. pretty interesting they press for everyone to use it only to remove it

  5. Well described post. I think by reducing amount of authorship results Google try to give credit only to high quality author. Its all about improving the the quality of the authors in Google search results.

    • The intent may have been to “improve the quality of the authors in Google search results,” but–to use an old American saying–the road to hell is paved with good intentions. Instead of focusing on authors, Google seems to focusing on publishers and partnerships (such as its authorship partnership with Examiner.com, a site that’s the very epitome of the “content farms” that Panda was supposed to crush).

      • You took the words right out of my mouth, Durant. I lost authorship some time ago and have all but given up getting it back. I only claim authorship on my own travel blog so I originally thought that maybe if I claimed authorship on other articles it would improve my author ranking. This article is both encouraging in that I see it’s not just me, and discouraging in that it seems like there’s not much I can do about it. I think authorship is one of the greatest things google has brought to the internet for controlling quality and it’s bothersome that Google doesn’t seem to like me very much.

        My major concern is what the long term consequences of this are going to be. Does this mean people will just give up on using authorship? Will there be a future update that smashes the people who’ve been trying to earn legitimacy the right way? I don’t have the long history in the web world that you do (from previous comments), so is this going to become one of those things where it’s almost impossible for new people to break into and if so what does that mean for the future of authorship as a whole? (Not asking you, just thoughts running through my head)

        Good intentions indeed. We all want quality content on SERPS, but without giving credit to authors over publishers it’s hard to see how anyone will be recognized.

        • The internet existed before Google, it certainly existed before Google Authorship and Google+. Keep on doing what you’re doing and wait for the rest of the world to come around, unless of course you suck, in which case give up now and save the Internet from another rant against Google.

          If you’re entire business model is built on gaming Google like Rap Genius’s was, and you go around bragging about your shady search engine optimization schemes, you’re business model is flawed and you’re ripe for a very public comeuppance.

          I’ll assume you have a business model that doesn’t rely on scamming Google and that you have other streams of traffic to your website besides Google’s organic search results. If you don’t, you should develop some. Travel is a very competitive vertical with some of the scummiest search engine optimization outside the porn industry. You have to take a very long view and have a business model that doesn’t fail at the whims of Google. If all your revenue comes from the traffic sent to you by Google, you really have no one to blame but yourself for not developing a proper business plan and strategy. Some in SEO build a site, exploit it, and move on. Authorship is designed to reward “real people” who have worked hard over a long time building a reputation online authoring content. I put up my first webpage in 1995. I never got rich, I never got famous, I’m just not greedy or an attention whore. I do think blaming Google for decisions you’ve made has grown pathetic.

          Hopefully you have a good blog, hopefully you can attract an audience with unique content and amusing tales, hopefully you can monetize this traffic or develop a revenue stream. As someone who’s maintained a website for 19 years, I’ve never put up a single banner ad, I’m just not all about the Benjamins.

          Good luck.

          • Thanks for the response Muskie. To be completely honest I don’t rely on my blog for revenue at all. I’ve got a simple travel blog that I started about 3 years ago. No gaming Google and no revenue. I just really appreciate the level of honesty that Google Authorship installs in people. From a writers standpoint of course, but primarily from a searcher’s standpoint. I rely on the internet when doing my own travel research and it’s very comforting to know that someone is willing to put their reputation on the line when they give an opinion.

            As a simple example, sometimes it’s hard for me to criticize a place when there was one thing about it I really loved. On the other hand, one thing may have really rubbed me wrong and I want to lash out about a particular destination. Knowing that I’m personally going to be completely tied to the work I do makes me stand back and ensure that I’m providing a thorough review.

            As far as Google itself is concerned, I’d hardly call my comment a rant against them. My opinion is simply that they have gone a step in the wrong direction if Mark’s analysis is correct. We all know that there are tons of big name websites that have four or five real writers and hundreds of people essentially spinning the other writers content. From a reader’s perspective, it’s refreshing to see that a little guy taking credit for his work can finally have a chance against the big fluff houses.

            You’re absolutely right with everything you’ve said. The travel world is full of nonsense and there are tons of people out there gaming Google and moving on. Which is exactly why it’s discouraging to think that Google may be adjusting their focus more to the site and not the author. I came to this article because I follow the author, not because I know who or what a Virante Orange Juice is or because I was searching Google for the latest SEO information. Authorship really brings a touch of humanity to the digital world in my opinion and I don’t know what Google is considering “quality” in this case, but I’d be thrilled to search a destination and know that every article on the SERP has a writer willing to put their name to their work.

  6. There will be a control over Authorship.

  7. Authorshippocalypse indeed. My author photo disappeared today. I was hoping it was only a temporary glitch, but it seems not…

  8. Something I noticed about what you call the Middle class:
    This may be a stretch, but the byline/no photo snippet looks like it may be showing on thinner content, while the same author & site get the full snippet with photo for “better” content.
    Best example I can give is a real estate agent I work with. He’s had authoriship since it began, has a pretty nice blog that is not the usual real estate filler and thousands of MLS property listings on the site. The blog posts, pages about various communities and various guides and other static pages still seem to have the full snippet for the most part (haven’t checked them all). The individual property listings, however, just get the byline. That makes sense to me, since the property listings do come from a feed and have very little customization to make them unique. That, and it isn’t as if the realtor actually “authored” all of those listings. Not quite Panda food, but close.
    So perhaps this is also influenced by content quality at the page level?

    Across the board, it also looks like level of activity on G+ may come into play, but I haven’t looked too deeply into that. On just a few searches with which I am very familiar with the usual results, those who have real followers and post/interact on G+ stayed. Those with a zombie profile which was probably made just to get the snippet are gone.

    • D’oh! Nevermind!
      I’m afraid I jumped the gun: I must have been logged in to Google when I saw that split-level authorship for real content vs listings. When logged out, it looks more like he’s got just the byline on everything now. Could have changed overnight, but I think I just forgot to check while logged out.

  9. Phew. Glad to see I am still considered by Google, as you say, First Class Authorship – For example when searching for the term in quotes: “when is the best time to post on social media” brings up a full rich snippet for me as well as: “2014 social media strategy tips”. I haven’t seen much in the way of 2nd or 3rd class snippets in the SERPS but I will definitely be keeping an eye out. Thanks.

  10. About time. Too many people abusing the markup. I really think it has more to do with the site and the type of page you’re attaching authorship to than anything to do with the actual author or their authority. For example, attaching authorship to the home page of a commercial site? Gone, because that’s not what it’s for. Attaching it to blog posts on a commercial site? That’s probably still there.

  11. I did a quick Google search and even for my silly posts I still get full authorship. Of course some of my silly posts are disproportionally popular. I’ve done a lot of work this summer on improving search results for my name. One factor I have in my favour that many might not is using the same domain name for a decade or more. I think Google is always greedy for new content, but they realize that a lot of websites come and go and those that last a decade or more, well that is a quality indicator. So people who have been established online might still be trusted while others who have rushed to proclaim themselves social media gurus haven’t in fact been ‘in the game’ all that long.

    I never checked for guest blog posts. I’m a rare guest blogger, usually my personal website is more popular than the one I guest blog on…

  12. I did a lot more Googling and for stuff off my main domain I seem to sometimes drop to second class authorship status. Of course some websites even on WordPress.com might not have authorship implemented properly in their theme. I tend not to worry too much about things beyond my control, unless of course they really disturb me. In general I’m happy with my Google results but I just don’t have as much time and energy to devote to this, especially in 2014. I’m going to rest on my laurels to a degree.

  13. Nice article Mark . I have been degraded to Second Class: Byline But No Photo authorship and i really don’t understand it. I will send you some of my observation and analysis which might help you while you still figure out about the whole thing.

  14. quite simply if I don’t follow an author… I don’t care how good or how much of an authority Google thinks they are! I don’t want to see anything special about the listing…the byline isn’t something I care about. Quite frankly I thought this authors bunk in the results is useless as tits on a boar…which would be why they are disappearing….wasted cycles and was IMO, just pandering to bloggers by Google. AuthorRank is a joke as are those who tout it…shows a clear lack of understanding in A.) how SE work B) what users want in the SERP…they are perfectly willing to fill the SERP up with crap so long as they are benefiting from it

  15. I see just a byline for a post of mine on SEJ. I see an author pic for another post of mine on SEJ. Then, one day I see no author pic for a post of mine on Powered by Search, the next day I observe one, and the day after it again disappears. Meanwhile, for my own name, author pic was transferred from my own site to my Inbound.org profile a few days back and then transferred back to my own site. Weird, weird stuff.

  16. My sites are in the “Second Class: Byline But No Photo” classification. How do I get the photo to show again on them?

  17. Seems to be a big change in all my niches – i think they are way more than 10-15% effected. im in category2 as it seems. my photo is gone but the name and circles is still there. in like 90% of the sites in the serps of my niche the photos are gone to. hope this wont effekt my clickrate to much :/

  18. Hey there,
    This is really nice! You have shared the best resources. I know hard worked to prepare such a great piece by you. Learn many new things from your post.
    Thanks for the sharing this kind of information.

  19. I’m having the 2nd class problem

  20. Authorship is becoming the next PageRank. I think it’s great that Google is reducing authorship for some people. Because that means if you’re building a new site, you’ll know if you’re building your perceived authority if Google starts adding your photo, giving you full authorship, etc. Without these restrictions who knows how Google perceives you?

    • “you’ll know if you’re building your perceived authority if Google starts adding your photo, giving you full authorship, etc.”

      I don’t think that’s true. In my sector, most of the results with photos and bylines (except for About.com) are buried pretty far down in the search rankings. If I had to venture a guess, I’d say that the Authorship “rich snippet” display algorithm is independent of any “authority” metrics that Google might be using (at least for now).

  21. Oh… too bad for the less popular authors out there…

  22. My clients have lost their picture. They all seem to be in the second class now.
    Including me. :(

  23. My website got listed Under “Second Class:” Can you please suggest me to get First Class author bio with photo

  24. I’m not a SEO expert, but from what I’m seeing on my own site, and from watching my competitors, leads me to believe that this update is more author-specific, or at least is a combination of site-specific and author-specific, rather than strictly being site specific. I own a small boat rental company in a resort community. Our site ranks #1 in SERPs for all of our main keywords. Unlike most of our competitors, we have embraced content marketing and have more high-quality, in-depth content on our site than any of our competitors (both locally and industry-wide). We only have 1 other local competitor who blogs and each post is very low-quality (~150-200 words), but he has implemented Google Authorship. Previously, both of us had the 1st class Authorship snippet. Now, our competitor only shows the “second-class” snippet, without his photo, and I’ve retained, for the most part MOST of mine. All of my boat-related content still shows my photo. HOWEVER, posts about other topics that are related to our primary topic but maybe not in my EXACT area of perceived (by Google) expertise (i.e. fitness, photography, fishing charter information, etc.) do NOT show my photo. So, I’m wondering if Google first considers the quality of the site, but also the main topic of the site, and the level of expertise that author has in that topic. Isn’t it possible that certain industries with a high level of competition (real estate, etc) were hit harder because the authors may not be as authoritative (compared to the competition) in that niche as Google would like?

  25. Hi my google image vanished a few months ago but one thing I have noticed is they are highlighting anything I post to my google+ profile, has anyone else noticed this? I look to be a 2nd class author now which is frustrating as I am just a blogger trying to make my way in writing. I write at least twice a week.

  26. I guess I am a second or 3rd class author, and all along I thought I was pretty good. Bummer. Thanks for the insight. I look forward to learning how to become a 1st class writer :-)

  27. Interesting post.
    Authorship was described like the new next big thing for SEO… Quite fun.

  28. Nice post.
    I had some markup for couple of my websites but one of my websites did not get any markup on Google no matter how hard I tried.
    Now Im in the Second class, will have to try to get back to the First class.
    Thanks

  29. This is some good information… Thank you for the insight..

  30. Really helpful post Mark! I’m newer to both SEO and Google+ after mostly focusing on Twitter and Facebook and my blogging strategies.

    Now that those are going well, I’m trying to make sense of rapidly changing world of SEO and learn the G+ platform. This post helped me take my understanding to a new level. Thank you!

  31. El señor y dueño de todo Google lo único que quiere conseguir con este barrido en los resultados con la desaparición de mas del 15%, es rentabilizar los mas de 20 millones de euros que se gasto en la red social Google + y obligarnos a utilizarla

  32. Thanks for posting this article. I noticed my authorship changes just today and was searching for an answer. It seems I have been demoted to Level 2 Authorship. I just don’t understand why Google would give us a nice feature and then strip it away without much of an explanation.

  33. Only way to see authorship image in Google Searches are
    -Make your site unique
    -Write Quality Posts
    -Do something to increase your site Priority

  34. Informative article, thanks. Authorship seems to be getting complicated now. A website though having uncommon content will get hampered in Google search if author’s class is second/third. Panda has really brought positive changes in results, lets hope for the best.

  35. Thank you for this post. I was beginning to think Google thought I was ugly as I’ve recently been downgraded to middle class. In webmaster tools your authorship stats are shown by impression vs CTR. Perhaps this has something to do with it?

    My personal opinion is that Google has seen an increase in Google Authorship. In turn this has affected SERPs. So they’ve slapped it down. Historically, it’s what they do. As for quality, well that’s a highly subjective term. It would be interesting to see the criterion for it.

    Anyway, any thoughts about authorstats?
    Thanks again for the post.

  36. I guess I am a second-class hybrid. I have the rich snippet text showing but it doesn’t show the amount of circles I am in. It only lists “by Jason McColly” and nothing else. Now granted this is a new site – month old – and maybe Google hasn’t caught up yet.

    But what is strange is that my old site – that has been around for almost a year – has my Author photo showing, the “by Jason McColly” byline, but that one doesn’t list my circle count either.

    Any thoughts??

    • One year isn’t that old on the Internet anymore. There are ten year old sites aplenty now, people with 1000s of posts and tweets. What niche, sector, vertical you’re in also plays a big role. You can be the world’s best taxidermist blogger, maybe that’ll impress Googlebot, show of your expertise and authority more than being the 103rd most popular Justin Bieber fan. That said I’d still bet on the Biebsblog especially if you plan to sell ads.

      Catching lightning in a bottle is still possible, but the signal to noise ratio is only getting worse online. Google is my top source of traffic, but other people get more traffic from social channels. I don’t even know what it says about me, I think I’ve Googled myself too much, it is probably better to have an associate Google the title of your best blog post and then see what Google says. When I Google my name, I think things are about as good as I can make it, but take away my middle name and it is another ball game. I use my middle name a lot in the past, now maybe that works against me…

      Whatever… I don’t lose sleep over my Google rankings.

  37. My current profile as stated in your article comes in second class. What ways should I follow to get into the first class? ;)

  38. When I saw my Google+ profile on SERP’s for the first time I felt special. I thought I made it in the exclusive club. This amazing feeling is now gone, my pic stopped appearing around late-January ’14. I didn’t know why. I just stumbled upon this post and it’s now clear. It’s a shame because it didn’t just help my click through rate, it gave a feeling of importance. A “hey, look at me I’m on TV” kinda moment! I hope I’ll manage to get back there some day!!!

  39. I’m just curious to know that what matrix Google will follow to determine quality author. Will it be the pagerank? site PR, Social Media engagement? or character count of article? surely Mattcutt will they that they will follow all these matrix at same time but I’m sure that one or two of these matrix will be be very important, we just have to find out…

  40. Now its all good again, dont know why but Google has changed it again. Nice post. Thanks

  41. Google authorship is lost mostly for affiliates. Its actually started in 2009 when and ever since it became harder and harder to use Google Adwords and even organic rankings.

  42. Dalam pengaplikasikan authorship di website wordpress, caranya bagaimana? maklum saya masih baru dalam dunia web.

  43. Definitely a smart move on Google’s part. The SEO industry jumped on top of it quickly and took advantage while it lasted.

Trackbacks

  1. […] Authorshippocalypse! Has the Google Authorship Penguin Finally Appeared?, Virante Orange Juice […]

  2. […] Authorshippocalypse! Has the Google Authorship Penguin Finally Appeared?, Virante Orange Juice […]

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  5. […] a cabo con la intención de eliminar esta funcionalidad en blogs de baja o poca calidad. En este artículo podéis saber más sobre el […]

  6. […] Google is reducing the amount of Authorship results shown in search. Find out why.  […]

  7. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun - Virante.org […]

  8. […] the broad adoption of rich snippets (which recently have been scaled back) we’re able to use our messaging across our website, Google+ and YouTube to dominate search […]

  9. […] this means, you’re not alone. It was promised months ago and is now a reality. Mark Traphagen shares his early take on the impact to search results. The long term impact isn’t completely clear, […]

  10. […] of reports recently of Google author snippets disappearing in various search results pages. Indeed, Virante have already crafted a detailed post on the main developments over the past couple of weeks, to […]

  11. […] were able to get the coveted author photo next to search results for their content (which has recently been cut back some). But not only could careful SEO testers find no evidence that having authorship affected search […]

  12. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun | Mark Traphagen via Virante. […]

  13. […] 7、December 2013: Authorship in Search Results Gets Restricted […]

  14. […] the authorship apocalypse of recent weeks, I actually looked inside Google Labs to see just what author stats were saying […]

  15. […] seems to have now been over compensated as Google has reduced the amount of authorship results in SERPs. This could have some interesting repercussions. For example a highly superior author […]

  16. […] I was just annoyed. I did a search on Google to see if this phenomenon was Google’s doing. Yes, it is. The post by Mr. Mark Traphagen (Virante Orange Juice) sum up nicely in his latest post, Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun. […]

  17. […] my answer through a friend on Google Plus; she shared an article about what’s known as the Authorshipocalypse. It seems the Google Guardians took sweeping action to combat authorship spam on Dec. 9th. Now they […]

  18. […] einem anderen Artikel, ebenfalls vom 19. Dezember berichtet Mark Traphagen ebenfalls vom Rückgang der Autorensnippets. Er steigt allerdings noch etwas tiefer in die Materie ein. So scheinen sich drei Klassen von […]

  19. […] the amount of rich snippets displayed in the search results.” Some have even called that an Authorshippocalypse is going on. Eeeek! Oh, the horror! There are changes going […]

  20. […] As Cutts mentioned in his speech, Google had been testing how a reduction in authorship would affect search, and they found that by reducing authorship by 15%, they actually saw an increase in quality. Although they didn’t make the definition of “quality” crystal clear, what we gathered from his speech was this: […]

  21. […] As Cutts mentioned in his speech, Google had been testing how a reduction in authorship would affect search, and they found that by reducing authorship by 15%, they actually saw an increase in quality. Although they didn’t make the definition of “quality” crystal clear, what we gathered from his speech was this: […]

  22. […] As Cutts mentioned in his speech, Google had been testing how a reduction in authorship would affect search, and they found that by reducing authorship by 15%, they actually saw an increase in quality. Although they didn’t make the definition of “quality” crystal clear, what we gathered from his speech was this: […]

  23. […] As Cutts mentioned in his speech, Google had been testing how a reduction in authorship would affect search, and they found that by reducing authorship by 15%, they actually saw an increase in quality. Although they didn’t make the definition of “quality” crystal clear, what we gathered from his speech was this: […]

  24. […] As Cutts mentioned in his speech, Google had been testing how a reduction in authorship would affect search, and they found that by reducing authorship by 15%, they actually saw an increase in quality. Although they didn’t make the definition of “quality” crystal clear, what we gathered from his speech was this: […]

  25. […] As Cutts mentioned in his speech, Google had been testing how a reduction in authorship would affect search, and they found that by reducing authorship by 15%, they actually saw an increase in quality. Although they didn’t make the definition of “quality” crystal clear, what we gathered from his speech was this: […]

  26. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  27. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  28. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  29. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  30. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  31. […] As Cutts mentioned in his speech, Google had been testing how a reduction in authorship would affect search, and they found that by reducing authorship by 15%, they actually saw an increase in quality. Although they didn’t make the definition of “quality” crystal clear, what we gathered from his speech was this: […]

  32. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  33. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  34. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  35. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  36. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  37. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  38. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  39. […] As Cutts mentioned in his speech, Google had been testing how a reduction in authorship would affect search, and they found that by reducing authorship by 15%, they actually saw an increase in quality. Although they didn’t make the definition of “quality” crystal clear, what we gathered from his speech was this: […]

  40. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  41. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun It appears that the Matt Cutts-promised reductions to the amount of Google Authorship results being shown in Google Search has begun… […]

  42. […] The current threats I have to deal with are changes coming down the line from Google, making it harder for small-time bloggers to obtain organic traffic. I won’t get into the specifics but more than ever it will be important to get subscribers […]

  43. […] As Cutts mentioned in his speech, Google had been testing how a reduction in authorship would affect search, and they found that by reducing authorship by 15%, they actually saw an increase in quality. Although they didn’t make the definition of “quality” crystal clear, what we gathered from his speech was this: […]

  44. […] in October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  45. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun […]

  46. […] I get too far into rel=author, I must mention there’s been threat of an authorshipocalypse recently. More data needs to be reviewed before anything conclusive can be said about whether […]

  47. […] Click The Following Link To Continue Reading:  http://www.virante.org/blog/2013/12/19/authorshippocalypse-google-authorship-penguin-finally-appeare… […]

  48. […] I noted in my post “Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun,” some authors appeared unaffected by the reduction, others had their results completely […]

  49. […] sono state le speculazioni a riguardo. Da alcuni approfondimenti e anche dalle parole di Cutts riportate da Search Engine Land sembra che il motivo principale […]

  50. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun (Virante) […]

  51. […] authorship profile will increase your SEO presence. Google recently decreased the number of authorship snippets by about 15 percent across search results, citing quality standards as the main reason. As mentioned earlier, guest […]

  52. […] source of traffic for most sites.  Still, the company seems to have tapered back the impact of Google+ in search. Considering the push for paid media on platforms like Facebook, and the staying power of search, […]

  53. […] seems as though during the very moments we were constructing this article, Google Authorship went and changed on us. But, it’s not the three steps above that have changed. BRACE YOURSELVES—even if you complete […]

  54. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun (Virante) […]

  55. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun (Virante) […]

  56. […] to Pivot: Google recommends using authorship and schema markup on your highest quality content to increase your chances of being […]

  57. […] Google has reduced the importance of Authorship tags as it was overused across it’s […]

  58. […] ir más allá con rel=autor, debo mencionar que recientemente se vivió un apocalipsis de  authorship. Se necesita revisar más datos antes de que se pueda concluir acerca de si se relaciona con los […]

  59. […] using your authorship on quality content you contribute to other websites or your own blog. Google recently purged its algorithm to limit the amount of times authorship snippets showed in the […]

  60. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun […]

  61. […] According to the Virante Orange Juice blog, Cutts’ exact words at PubCon were as follows: […]

  62. […] the broad adoption of rich snippets (which recently have been scaled back) we’re able to use our messaging across our website, Google+ and YouTube to dominate search […]

  63. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun (Virante) […]

  64. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun (Virante) […]

  65. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun (Virante) […]

  66. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun (Virante) […]

  67. […] far, anecdotal research has shown a lack of even-handedness when it comes to administering common authorship standards. As a result, we see a reduction in “first class authorship” in the display of SERP […]

  68. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun (Virante) […]

  69. […] using your authorship on quality content you contribute to other websites or your own blog. Google recently purged its algorithm to limit the amount of times authorship snippets showed in the […]

  70. […] October, Matt Cutts took the stage at Pubcon and suggested that a 10-15% reduction in authorship seemed to improve search quality. Many took this as a sign that Google had reduced the amount of authorship mark-up appearing in […]

  71. […] Authorshipocalypse! The Great Google Authorship Purge Has Begun (Virante) […]

  72. […] a different way that Google verifies authors? Some say yes. In fact, at PubCon in 2013, Google’s Matt Cutts discussed the future of authors in the search results, and eluded to what may be coming: “It’s not just […]

  73. […] drop in the number of tracked searches displaying authorship mark-up.” Another article by Virante author Mark Traphagen predicted the “Authorshipocalypse” and Great Google Authorship Purge in […]

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